50mm Lens, 70-200mm IS lens, Birds, Canon 50D, Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, Nature, Photo Challenges, Photography

Weekly Photo Challenge: Intricate

The original post for this week’s photo challenge mentions a robin’s nest as a possible example of intricate.  I’m going to take that a step further and suggest that it is not only the nest that is intricate, but that those weeks of being an egg and hatchling are perilous and require a lot of intricate details go right for the young bird. Two years ago four of the five health hatches were taken away by a larger bird of prey, a simple example of what can go wrong for these young ones.  This year’s nest is doing well so far, four healthy hatches.  The nest is getting crowded as the birds are growing, here is the nest first thing this morning:

ISO 800 4mm f/2.7 1/200

ISO 800 4mm f/2.7 1/200

I have been taking a quick photo on the macro setting with my point and shoot every morning to get a beak count before I set up my larger camera.  I had taken this photo and was inside getting the chairs for my larger set-up when I heard a lot of squawking and looked outside to see that one of the birds was on the ground and hopping away.  Much to the distress of the adult birds the young bird was sitting out in the open like this:

ISO 800 200mm f/6.3 1/250

ISO 800 200mm f/6.3 1/250

The adults spent several minutes trying to corral their youngster:

ISO 800 200mm f/6.3 1/250

ISO 800 200mm f/6.3 1/250

The baby hopped back closer to the nest and was fed by the adults:

ISO 800 195mm f/6.3 1/250

ISO 800 195mm f/6.3 1/250

But the nest is too high up for this baby to get back in.  The adults managed to lure it over to a patch of wildflowers we have.  A few minutes later, the young bird was led by the adults into our hedgerow which will provide more cover while the bird is learning to fly.

It seemed like a bit of a stressful moment for the adult birds as they saw to their young offspring.  Their chatter attracted the attention of other animals who came to watch.  In addition to myself, there was another pair of adult robins, a pair of mourning doves, a northern flicker, a squirrel, and a rabbit.  All of these animals, attracted by the noise, came to watch the moment unfold.  After it was over the robins went back to the business of feeding the rest of their remaining offspring.

ISO 1000 50mm f/6.3 1/250

ISO 1000 50mm f/6.3 1/250

Just a few of the intricacies that go into being a robin. As for me, to capture these few moments required two cameras and three lenses.  I started with my point and shoot.  The rest of the photos were taken with my Canon 50D.  I used my longer 70-200mm lens for the yard shots and then switched to the 50mm when taking the last photo.

I’ve been posting photos of this journey on Flickr and Twitter, so feel free to join me there and follow along. Your comments are welcome below.

Cheers!

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148 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Intricate

  1. Fascinating! I’ve often wondered what happened to babies who fell out of the nest and couldn’t get back. Several years ago baby robin not quite ready to fly ended up in our yard, with both parents trying to fend off a much larger crow that was trying to kill and eat the baby. The distress of the parents was so evident that it was heartbreaking. We didn’t know where the nest was, and the baby didn’t stand a chance, so we violated the circle of life and took it to a shelter that promised to care for it and release it when it had learned to fly. I hope we will see more your robins!

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Amy, I scrolled this post on a large computer screen and so when I got to the third image – I was surprised – not sure why – was it the rich color – or the suspense in the way you noted what was happening. then the 4th photo is my fav – and maybe has an intricacy all its own – like there seems to be three layers – the grass the pavement and then the back lighter section – then small to big to bigger – the seeds and their design feel – and then the wavy line made across the top of the way the 3 birds are standing gives us a flow – and then there is more – but just wrap it up with the warmth that is also felt with the paternal care that is depicted.

    Liked by 3 people

    • No, I didn’t really want to bother the birds, and this one was pretty much ready. The space in the hedgerow is a nice next step for these little ones as they grow a bit more. Those first few moments when they are making their way from the nest to the hedgerow is always a bit tense, because they are exposed, but it looks like this one has made the transition.

      Liked by 1 person

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  4. Perfect timing, wonderful photos and great interpretation of this week’s challenge. Sounded like you had to move fast for the shots. The poor robin, I’m glad nothing happened to it when it hopped out of the nest. Maybe it was excited to come into this world and is eager to go places. At least good to see there are worms for them to eat. No going hungry 😀

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: INTRICATE | The Adventures of Iñigo Boy

  6. I love your photos, what a wonderful post. ❤ The Robins bring so much joy, you have captured the the little family so well. What a great start to my Saturday morning. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  7. I love to watch the birds out in front of our condo, especially the robins hopping around on the ground looking for food. I don’t think we have any nests with eggs, yet. Of course, Northern Mockingbirds nest in the trees out front and they are very territorial. Other birds don’t usually nest near them.

    Capturing birds is a challenge. All of your photos are beautiful!

    Liked by 5 people

  8. Very nice piece! Really well done, not only on the post and photos but also on the time and effort that it takes to record this moment in a birds life story.
    incidentalnaturalist.com

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Emi says:

    I love watching birds. Your post reminded me of pigeons I feed everyday outside my window. They have grown so comfortable around me that they sometimes enter my house just a litle bit. I haven’t been able to take any pictures, though. Anyway, loved your post. Birds are majestic creatures.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Fantastic photographs, I loved the drama of the story and the size difference between the baby and parent birds. I loved your interpretation of the photo challenge, and the nest looks great! Keep up the good work!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, I actually use this blog as a reference point for future work. I’m not that good at remembering settings, so if I have them catalogued here, I can just look them up and not have to re-invent the wheel when I go to shoot under similar conditions.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Used to have a pair nest on a drainpipe near my window before I moved. I could see right into their nest and was sad one year when I found one of their eggs on the path below. Thanks for the refresher.

    Like

  12. I created a new blog last month called Real Life Natural Wife. I really enjoyed your blog. I hope you’ll come check it out and leave me a comment with your thoughts! Congrats on being freshly pressed! Have a great day!

    Like

  13. Wendy Crouse says:

    Amy, so happy that this year’s eggs has safely hatched and are growing safely! The children at SABB loves the poster of your first set of bird pictures.

    Like

  14. Every back yard is a safe haven for our little creatures Great Shots and Story, we should all see, luv, and teach our young to enjoy the love of others like even the Robin Family

    Like

  15. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Muse | Photography Journal Blog

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