Instagram, iPhone, Luminar, Photography, Squares, travel

January Squares: Late Afternoon Light

I was just in Strasbourg France for a few hours. Long enough to get this photo though:

ISO 25 f/2.2 4.2mm 1/1083 sec

Also, long enough to convince me that a trip back would be a good thing. For the photo above, I wanted to accentuate the glow of the summer afternoon:

ISO 25 f/2.2 4.2mm 1/1083 sec

So after cropping and straightening the photo, I added the Luminar look, Daydream, and set it at 79%.

The Instagram version is here:

Added to Day 26 of January Light.

Cheers!

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18-55mm IS lens, Canon 80D, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, travel

What A View

This photo was taken from a window of St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall:

ISO 400 f/11 18mm 1/320 sec

Of all the castle’s we have been through, this was the one I could imagine living in. Believe it or not, it actually felt kind of homey to me, usually, I’m not a fan of a huge fan of castles other than to look through them.  It helped that it was a beautiful day. Really not typical British weather. I thought this terraced garden was quite beautiful too. When it came to editing though, I wanted to tone the image down a bit:

ISO 400 f/11 18mm 1/320 sec

The first step towards that was to drop the highlights, the whites and the blacks. I’ve added a custom preset look as well. It’s my homemade variation on a vintage look. I liked the effect it had on the green and blue tones in the image. The process of creating the vintage look I wrote about in this post.

This post was written as a response to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, A Room with a View. Your comments and questions are welcome below.

Cheers!

 

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11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, travel, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: A Continuation

The file I chose to work on this past week was a continuation of and a revisit of work I have done in the past. The file under construction is this one:

ISO 250 F/9 22mm 1/500 sec

An older edit can be found here. Recently, I posted about using sliders that I don’t often use and this edit is a continuation of me working on using them. The resulting edit is this one:

ISO 250 F/9 22mm 1/500 sec

Prior to conversion to black and white, I used the custom white balance, luminance, dehaze, and polarize filters. It’s then converted to black and white with a red filter. The matte look and Orton effect filters have been applied and it has two vignettes applied to it.

A lot of filters but I am pleased with this edit, for now. The photo was taken a few years ago from the grounds of the Monte Cassino Polish war cemetery and is a shot of the nearby Monte Cassino Abbey  It was a day trip from Rome, and a memorable day from a fabulous holiday.

Your comments or questions are most welcome below. This post was inspired by the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge which has the theme Special Spots Shots for this week.

Cheers!

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Instagram, iPhone, Luminar, Photo Editing, Photography, Squares, travel

January Squares: Light Up the Room

I assume the ring had some serious bling to be immortalized in a tapestry:

ISO 640 f/2.2 4.15mm 1/17sec

Actually, this tapestry was more likely a remembrance of an important wedding of powerful people or families. Still, I found it a bit humorous. Also, it was absolutely beautiful, not even the bit of fade of time could obscure that. The tapestry is hung at the Munich Residence.

For the square edit, in Luminar I boosted the Luminance a bit and then added the look, Metro Tokyo 3 Faded:

ISO 640 f/2.2 4.15mm 1/17sec

With this edit, I am imagining some of what I think would have been the original lustre.

The Instagram version is here:

View this post on Instagram

Bling. #januarylight #tapestry #munich

A post shared by Amy Maranto (@marantophotography) on

Added to Day 8 of January Squares.

Cheers!

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18-55mm IS lens, Canon 80D, Luminar, Photo a week Challenge, Photo Challenges, travel, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: Little Used Sliders

Over this summer I had the opportunity to hike up to Kehlsteinhaus, or Eagle’s Nest, a Nazi-era building associated with Adolf Hitler, although apparently he was afraid of heights and hated the place.  Today it is a building you can tour and a restaurant. There are a couple different ways you can visit. We went early in the day and walked up. It’s tough if you decide to do it that way, wear hiking boots, monitor the weather, dress in layers, and bring food and water. I didn’t go into the building itself, I was there for the views:

ISO 250 f/11 18mm 1/320sec

I’ve edited this in Luminar.  The edits I will discuss below are a few that I don’t often do as part of my workflow:

ISO 250 f/11 18mm 1/320sec

The first was a custom white balance. I used the little eyedropper to find a neutral grey and clicked. I struggle with white balance sometimes, mostly because I don’t work with it a lot. I think that my camera does a pretty decent job most of the time. The other two filters that I used here were the dehaze and the polarizing filters. A lot of times, if a scene is hazy, I let it stay that way. I think that is just a matter of personal preference, haze either bothers you or it doesn’t and generally speaking, I fall into that second category.

Even though I am posting this, I don’t really feel like I am finished with this photo. I’m not completely satisfied with the edit and think I may prefer the original to the edit.  I’m going to let this sit, probably for months, then I’ll take another look and re-evaluate. That’s the beauty of digital, another version is always possible.

Feel free to leave a comment or question below.

Cheers!

Added to A Photo A Week Challenge, Opposite Weather, because man, is this photo the exact opposite of today’s very grey day!

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Canonet 28, Film Photography, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Monochrome Monday, Photo Editing, Photography, travel

Go Exploring With Me

I struggled a bit with what title to give this post. It touches on a lot of things all springing from one photo:

This post is about:

  • Film photography, what I do and don’t know.
  • The intersection of film and digital, or at least where I am with that.
  • History and how we chose to display it.
  • A lovely boat ride in the Lake District.

The photo in question is this one:

Taken with a Canonet 28

I’ll start with the Canonet 28 camera I am using. It was originally owned by my Great-Uncle who, according to my memory, owned all kinds of photography equipment and I suspect would have made the foray into digital as well had he lived to see that era. At his passing, this camera went to my Aunt, who a few years ago was kind enough to ship me a box of camera goodies that had belonged to my Great-Uncle. Of all the things in the box, it was this camera that caught my imagination the most.

But did it still work? That was a question that would require a new battery and some film. Jim Grey writes a blog that I follow that covers film photography and he has a post specifically about my camera. Jim’s blog also had some suggestions about film and batteries and generally was a good starting point for me to get the camera going. Also, I googled the camera and was able to track down the original owner’s manual that came with it. This paragraph should give you an idea of how much I do not know about film photography.

Something that I do know is that regardless of what camera, digital or film, that you are using if you are standing on a vibrating boat, a perfectly still image is going to be really hard. So I just embraced that reality, choosing to shoot the also moving flag and just make the image about motion.

The boat in question is actually a Victorian-era steam yacht gondola, that was rebuilt and restored. Operated seasonally by the National Trust, it makes for a lovely cruise in the Lake District. The little history geek that resides within me loves when a tangible piece of history is displayed in this way.

Having captured this image on film and had it developed, I then scanned it to my computer. I do not have a scanner built with photography in mind. Anyway, I edited my scan in Luminar 3. I did not crop the image. That’s part of my process learning to use the viewfinder and lens setup of the camera, figuring out what does and doesn’t work. There are also a few spots and imperfections visible that are a reflection of the imperfections of the camera. I was pleased with how few there were given the age of the camera.

Overall, this was a nice foray into exploring film photography. Since the camera works and I like the feel of it, I will be loading another roll of film in. Film will never take the place of digital for me, the two are vastly different experiences, but I will continue to tinker with film.

This post is a little bit different than most of my others. I’m happy for you to leave a question or comment below.

Cheers!

Added to Lens-Artist Photo Challenge, On Display.

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18-55mm IS lens, Birds, Canon 80D, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Photo Editing, Photography, travel

St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin

This seagull seemed to be waiting for something:

ISO 800 f/11 1/125sec 18mm

I thought it was a nice scene, so I snapped the photo. In order to tell the story though, a crop was the much needed first edit. I’ve applied other edits as well, boosting shadows and luminance, but this is just a simple image, my memory of a walk in the park, so I’ve kept the edits simple as well:

ISO 800 f/11 1/125sec 18mm

Your thoughts on the scene are welcome below.

Cheers!

Added to Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, Waiting.

 

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18-55mm IS lens, Canon 80D, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, made with Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Picfair, Six Word Saturday, travel

Detail in Dublin

 

ISO 800 f/11 1/100sec 18mm

Think they mind my circling path?

If they did, they didn’t say.

Snap and continue on my way.

ISO 800 f/11 1/250sec 39mm

Picfair version here.

Added to Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, Candid and Six-Word Saturday.

Cheers!

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50mm Lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, made with Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Picfair, travel, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: Editing the Landscape

I do a lot of photo editing and it is easy to get into the habit of using the same filters every time.  In order to encourage myself to try different things, I watch a lot of tutorial videos on Youtube. I feel free to adopt some suggestions and leave others, but I think it is important to understand that most photo editing software has lots of options and so knowing what is even available is important.  One of the files I was working on the week was this photo, taken at Mt. Snowdon in Wales in 2016:

ISO 800 f/13 1/800sec 50mm

It was a fabulous view, even if this particular file doesn’t really seem to suggest that. I was also watching this tutorial on Youtube. It’s specific to editing a landscape in Luminar which is the software I am using, but I would say that the suggestions made can be applied in other editing software as well. One of the first suggestions was to use the dehaze slider. Now that happens to be a slider I almost never use but for this file, it seemed like a really good starting place. For this edit below, I then went on to use the sky filter, the foliage enhancer, the HSL panel for luminance, and the small details slider for sharpening. The final edit was this one:

ISO 800 f/13 1/800sec 50mm

I think this edit is a pretty close representation of what I saw that day. From there I decided to do a more creative edit. This particular edit has two additional layers, the first was the Luminar look, Overlook, added with modifications and the second layer is an AI filter and vignette. Here is that version:

ISO 800 f/13 1/800sec 50mm

I like it also but will readily admit it is not what I saw. The Picfair version of it is here.

So which version is better? which do you prefer? Feel free to let me know in the comments below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Back Catalog.

 

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50mm Lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, made with Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, travel, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: LUT’s

Before I get into the steps and explanations I’ll say that I wanted to experiment a bit with this file:

ISO 800 f/13 1/2000 sec 50mm

It’s shot from Mt. Snowdon in Wales, a hike that is popular but needs to be treated with respect, so if you are thinking of doing it some planning and also checking the current weather conditions are necessary.

The final edit is this one:

ISO 800 f/13 1/2000 sec 50mm

I was thinking about two things in this edit. The first was that in person, the haze that shows in the photo file seemed less. The second was that the contrast between light and dark seemed more pronounced. I’ve reflected this in both the sky and the shadows on the mountain. The final edit is more like the hike that resides in my memory.

I started with editing the sky on its own layer. In this past post, I talk a bit more about that and include a link with video instructions. What I would point out here is that I think it is important to do sky specific edits on its own layer because this makes it possible to revisit the edit and make changes without having to effect other edits done on other layers.

The next phase of the editing process was more experimental. In this case, I am using LUTs to create a new look for the photo. LUT stands for lookup table and when you apply one it will change the color and tone of the image based on the instructions that are in the LUT. This explanation of LUTs and how they work I have chosen to link in because I think it provides a good explanation of what a LUT is and then directions of how to access them within Luminar which is the software I am using. The further step that I have taken is to use two LUTs on the photo. I have each of them on a separate layer. Having set the two layers in place, I could then use the sliders available on each to control the amount of LUT applied. When working with this type of preset, it is important to remember that once applied, you can make edits to the preset, you are not obligated to keep it as is.

Editing software comes with all sorts of presets and as you are learning to use it, I would advise experimenting. Making even small changes from a preset can help the photo you are working on look more like the vision you have for it rather than a set idea the software has added. Feel free to comment or ask a question below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Tourism.

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