11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photography, Tuesday Photo Challenge, Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday, Peak District

ISO 800 21mm f/20 1/640sec

Added to Lens-Artists Weekly Photo Challenge, Delicate, and Tuesday Photo Challenge, Vista.

Cheers!

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Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photography, Six Word Saturday, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Six Word Saturday, Royal Albert Hall

Royal Albert Hall, quite a sight,

bathed in the winter golden glow,

of London lit up at night.

 

ISO 800 4.3mm f/2.7 1/200sec

Cheers!

Added to Six Word Saturday and Tuesday Photo Challenge, Night.

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Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, Luminar, Photo a week Challenge, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I am Working On: Flexing the Rules

When it comes to photography there are some rules worth thinking about. Rules tend to make a good starting point when you are photographing and editing. Whether you keep to the rules or not will hopefully vary. This is a post about almost keeping the rules and the technology that can help you refine your photographic vision. The photo I was editing was this one:

ISO 400 19mm f/16 1/250sec

Rules Broken: Shooting during the middle of the day and shooting in Jpeg format.

Verdict: Guilty and unrepentant. You only live once and go live your best life. You can tell them you read it here if you feel the need to pass the buck.

During the editing process, the first edit I did was a crop. I used the rule of thirds overlay within my crop tool, so this is what was on my screen:

This gives you an idea of how close to the Rule of Thirds this photo is.

You can see how I’ve taken some liberties with the rule of thirds here while keeping the spirit of the rule. I do this a lot, start with the overlay and then go from there. There is a simple reason for this “almost” rule of thirds image. It’s the other elements in the photo. There are some distracting yellow flowers at the top that are being cropped out and a few purple ones near the bottom. An element deliberately kept in was the white flowers that are a color match for the butterfly.

Rules Broken: Rule of Thirds.

Verdict: Just a bit out of bounds.

Next up is sharpening. I’ve approached this in a bit of a different way. Firstly, I did not want to sharpen the whole image. I was only interested in the butterfly and the blooming flowers. The rest of the image had enough detail for my liking. In Luminar, instead of using the clarity slider, I’ve used the details enhancer. I prefer this slider because it breaks it down into three separate sliders, small, medium, and large. I’ve boosted the small and medium details.  I also used a mask to apply the filter to only the area I wanted the change. I use to hate masks, but over the years the technology behind them has improved making them much easier to use:

This shows what area the details have been given a boost.

Rule Broken: Always sharpen your image.

Verdict: Managed to both keep and break this rule, how annoyingly clever is that?

The last edit was the vignette. The default in editing software is the center of the image. If your editing software allows you to change that, I would encourage you to give that a try, it’s a way of highlighting your main subject which may not be in the center of the image. In this case, I put the vignette center on the eye of the butterfly.

Rule Broken: Vignette is centered in the middle of the image.

Verdict: Guilty and also guilty of encouraging others.

Here is the final image with all the mentioned edits:

ISO 400 19mm f/16 1/250sec

What is your verdict? Do these edits work, with the rules flexed and even broken in places? Feel free to comment below.

Cheers!

Added to A Photo A Week Challenge, Rule of Thirds and Tuesday Photo Challenge, Technology.

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18-55mm IS lens, Canon 80D, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Tuesday Photo Challenge

But How To Get There?

St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a beautiful place. It’s location, just off the mainland makes getting there part of the experience:

ISO 400 35mm f/11 1/640sec

This photo, my original file, shows two ways you can go about it. In this photo, the tide is in, enough that you can take a small boat. That’s how we arrived in the morning. On the right-hand side, the pathway you can use is visible but still submerged, that’s how you can get there and back with the tide is out. A few hours after this photo was taken that is how we got back. My final edit for this photo is this one:

ISO 400 35mm f/11 1/640sec

The first edit I did on this photo was to crop and straighten it. It was a bright and hazy day, so I needed some edits to boost the colors a bit and add some clarity. The scene itself though I wanted to preserve close to the way I saw it, so I didn’t apply any more creative edits in this case. A more creative version of this site, I published here.

What do you think of these edits? Feel free to leave a comment below. This was a really interesting place to visit, so I’d recommend it if you are ever in the area.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Connections.

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11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Six Word Saturday, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Six Word Saturday, Blue Grotto Malta

White rocky shore,

Water vividly blue.

ISO 200 22mm f/11 1/320sec

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Rock and Six-Word Saturday.

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11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: I Wonder what that Button Does?

Sometimes a little bit of curiosity can be a good thing. When it comes to photo editing this translates into: just push that button or slide that slider and see what happens. It’s usually pretty easy to back up if you end up with a result that you don’t like. All you need is curiosity and a little bit of time. This image below was taken at Pointe du Hoc.

ISO 400 22mm f/16 1/100sec

My first edit was this one:

ISO 400 22mm f/16 1/100sec

It features a lot of the edits you would expect from me. I’m hoping you think this edit pops a bit and is a bit more clear. I’m hoping that you don’t think that it varies too much from the original. With this type of edit, I’m looking to represent the scene as it was.

As per my recent blog post, I saved a version of it. Then I continued to edit. I was looking to create something a bit different:

ISO 400 22mm f/16 1/100sec

When I am in this more creative mode, my layer panel starts to look like this:

Layers Panel screenshot

If you have no interest in using layers or already know all about them, feel free to skip the rest of this post, leave a comment or like below if you that appeals to you. The rest of this post is a bit about layers and how to use them.

In the screenshot, the original file and then the layer above it is what led to the natural version of the photo. The layer marked, “silver lining” and the two above that are part of the more creative version. I’d like to mention a few things that I think are important to consider when making a creative edit. The first is that I think it is really helpful to have additional edits on separate layers. This makes it easy to see what you have done and remove or further work on any particular edit. Making a new layer is easy and pretty universal in photo editing applications. In this particular case, I clicked on the “+” to the right of “Layers” and a drop-down option was “add adjustment layer”. Let’s say on Adjustment Layer 1 I wanted to adjust the exposure.  I do that and then add Adjustment Layer 2 and edit for clarity on that layer.  I could then click on the eyeball from Adjustment Layer 1 and that would turn off the exposure adjustment if I wanted to see what the photo would look like with just the clarity adjustment. That gives me the flexibility of having several edits that can easily be adjusted or even deleted independently of one another. Also, It is possible to rename layers, for example, the layer that is called silver lining, that is the name of the filter I put on that layer. In this case that not only makes it easier to know what adjustment is there but also functions as a reminder to myself as to what filter I have used. Changing the name of a layer is done by clicking over the text, and changing the text when the text box appears.

Your thoughts on my edits and the use of layers are all welcome below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Wonder.

Picfair version here.

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70-200mm IS lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: Creating A Custom Workspace

Part of what I enjoy about photography is the editing process. These days there are a lot of editing software choices on the market. Then once you are settled on one that you like, the edit options within that software are usually extensive. That’s great. Except when it is so much that it becomes a distraction.  The reality is that I shoot a lot of photos like this:

ISO 200 70mm f/16 1/250sec

When I then open this photo in the edit tab of Luminar 3 I have a lot of filter options, but there are a few that I almost always use. The rest are helpful sometimes but are just clutter to my process at other times. A way to clear that clutter is to create a custom workspace with just select filters. I did just that and here is what it looks like:

To create this, I did the following. First, where the dropdown now says “Amy 1”, I clicked the down arrow, and selected “clear workspace”. Then from the filters I picked the ones I almost always use and in the order I use them, opened them, that added them to the list you see there. Then I clicked again on that down arrow and one of the options is “save custom workspace” it then prompted me for a name, that’s when I added “Amy 1”. Now anytime I open a new image, I can click that down arrow and my saved workspace is there. Or, even better, I also clicked to have that show as the default. Here are those filters applied to my original image:

ISO 200 70mm f/16 1/250sec

From there I could have added more filters and done some other editing. Sometimes I will, but in this case, I wasn’t really looking to do anything else with this image.

I spend quite a bit of time thinking about my photography workflow. My hope is that this workspace will make the process a bit smoother. Do you use a custom workspace in your editing process? I never have before so this is just something I’m giving a try. Feel free to comment on that or on my edit below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Round.

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11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Picfair, Tuesday Photo Challenge, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: Editing in Black and White

This week I was working on learning something new.

I began with this file:

ISO 200 22mm f/16 1/200sec

And a webinar that I was watching which is now archived here. The webinar is about creating a black and white image in Luminar.

Here is my black and white edit:

ISO 200 22mm f/16 1/200sec

No need to adjust your screen. No, I am not kidding about what I wrote above but yes, I am aware that is a color version of my photo.

I’ll take a couple of steps back. The first thing I did was crop the image a bit. Then I used the eraser tool to get rid of whatever that is in the lower left side of the image and a few of the people that were on the beach. I wanted to create a nice expansive space in the foreground of the photo.

Then, I was watching the webinar on creating a black and white image. Often times in black and white edits, you will have the option of putting a color filter on the image, it keeps the image black and white, but depending on the filter, different elements of the photo are accentuated. In this case, I kept it set at just a plain black and white, which makes the photo pretty flat.  Here is a screenshot of what that looked like:

This next screenshot shows that plus my next step which was to drag the luminance sliders around. Making the blue low and the yellow high created the deep blue tones while leaving the stones nice and monochrome:

I was pleased with the way this experiment turned out, but what do you think of the results? Feel free to leave a comment below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Growth.

Picfair version here.

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Flowers, Instagram, iPhone, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Six Word Saturday, Tuesday Photo Challenge

Oh Boy! A New Photography Toy!

View this post on Instagram

A trio for your #tuesdaymotivation #flowers #roses #hipstamatic

A post shared by Amy Maranto (@marantophotography) on

No, I didn’t need another one,

but gee, Hipstamatic sure is fun!

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Rose and Six Word Saturday.

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11-22mm Lens, Canon 50D, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, Picfair, travel, Tuesday Photo Challenge

On the Bank of the River Seine

This post started with a visit to Chateau Gaillard, which is a castle that was built by Richard the Lionheart and sits on the bank of the River Seine in Normandy, France. As you can see from this original shot, it was a beautiful day:

ISO 200 22mm f/16 1/200sec

My first edit was this one:

ISO 200 22mm f/16 1/200sec

I was initially happy with it, but decided last week to take another shot at it and here is the second edit:

ISO 200 22mm f/16 1/200sec

The first change, was a minor one to the cropping. The second was to change the tones just a bit before applying other boosting edits like changes to the sky and sharpening. None of these second edits were massively different than the first, but overall I like the second version better.

What do you think, do you prefer one version over the other or are these similar enough that you don’t have a particular preference? Your thoughts and comments are welcome below.

Cheers!

Added to Tuesday Photo Challenge, Bank.

Older Picfair version here, newer one here.

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