Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, Lens Artists Photo Challenge, Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography, What I Am Working On

What I Am Working On: Interpretation

While a good majority of my photography is about recording a scene and then editing to show what I saw, it is fun also to interpret a scene. That was the case when I shot this photo at the Rembrandtplein in Amsterdam in the Fall of 2016:

ISO 200 f/2.7 1/200sec 4.3mm

This photo gives you an idea of what the bronze statues around Rembrandt’s statue look like. They are an interpretation and tribute to his painting The Night Watch. I took the first photo as a way of remembering the overall scene. Then I took this photo:

ISO 200 f/2.7 1/250sec 4.3mm

It was a more detailed shot of the statues, as I found their texture to be very interesting. I knew I wanted a few things out of my interpretation. The first was to keep that detail of the bronze as an important element. The second was to use the terribly blown out sky in a creative way:

ISO 200 f/2.7 1/250sec 4.3mm

An adjustment to the detail slider helped bring the clarity I wanted. I used the “small details” only. The Luminar Look, Enigma, gave me the glowing sky I wanted.

Now a word about cropping. The first crop was done in-camera. That was the conscious step of photographing the whole scene and then asking myself what I found most interesting about what was in front of me and then taking a photo of that. That is how the second photo came to be. I often approach photography this way. Particularly when I travel, I find this a nice exercise in being in the moment. It makes for nice memories too, when I looked at these original files this morning, I could remember this moment. The second crop was done during the editing process, that Booking.com building is pretty distracting. When the crop didn’t remove it entirely, I used the clone and stamp tool to take the rest of it out.

The last edit was to set a vignette with the center on the statue. It’s a pretty subtle vignette, particularly compared to some of the other, more drastic, edits.  A bit of a final nudge.

Your thoughts, comments, or questions about my method or the edits are welcome below.

Cheers!

Added to Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, Cropping the Shot.

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Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, made with Luminar, Photo Challenges, Photography, Squares

April Squares: Top Shots, Amsterdam Canal

ISO 200 f/3.5 1/500sec 6mm

Day 3, find other responses here.

Date and Location of Photo: October 27, 2016. The canals of Amsterdam, I recommend both walking along them and taking the boat ride. Two different perspectives that are worth your time and effort.

Thoughts on the Edit: I’ve added the Luminar Look, Autumn Colors and on a separate layer, my own vintage edit preset.

 

April Squares, an Explanation:

When Becky announced that the April Squares theme was going to be “top”, I thought it over and then sent her a message, then pitched my idea. She was open to my theme within the theme and the result is my response to the April Squares challenge.

I move a lot and I have a move pending. I’ve lived here in England for about four years and will be heading to the United States. Exact dates to be determined, given the current world situation, details have yet to be worked out. My April Squares is a “top shots” reflection on the last four years. Each square represents some moment or place that was meaningful to me. They are in chronological order moving forward in time. I’m attempting to post every day. All photos will be edited in Luminar 3. I hope you enjoy following along, I’ve enjoyed the process of creating. Your comments and thoughts are welcome below.

 

Cheers!

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Canon Powershot ELPH 320 HS, Photo Challenges, Photo Editing, Photography

Weekly Photo Challenge: Transmogrify

When I see the word transmogrify, I always think of Calvin and Hobbes, so despite the definition of the word being to change in a negative way, I can’t help but thinking of it in a more light-hearted, positive way.  The way that the meaning of a word can be influenced by the way that it is used is interesting to me.

People not only change language to suit them, they also change their homes to suit them as well. Imagine that this is what you see when you look out the window of this house:

ISO 200 4.33mm f/2.7 1/400

ISO 200 4.33mm f/2.7 1/400

Turning around to face the interior you would not expect to see this:

ISO 1250 5.44mm f/3.2 1/20

ISO 1250 5.44mm f/3.2 1/20

But this is the interior of a house that is now the Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer Ops Solder or Our Lord in the Attic, a hidden Catholic Church in Amsterdam.  The church dates from 1663 and was used to celebrate Mass in secret when doing so in public was prohibited. As I was taking this photo though, I was thinking about how it would look if I edited it to a black and white version:

ISO 1250 5.44mm f/3.2 1/20

ISO 1250 5.44mm f/3.2 1/20

As much as I like the warm tones of the original, there is something that I find more settled in the black and white version. Instead of talking about the specifics of how I created the black and white version, I would like to just focus on the first editing step.  I started with cropping.  I started there because there were two things that bothered me about this image, the jacket visible on the right side, and the fact that the altar is crooked.  Using the straighten option within the cropping tool in Photoshop fixed both of these problems.  I’ve included a link because about halfway through the article there is a photo showing exactly where to find the tool if you are not familiar with how to use it.  In my opinion this is the easiest way to straighten a photo and if this is something I know I am going to need to do I often start with that step.

So, what do you think of the transformation? I think the crop helped a lot.  Do you have a preference for the color or the black and white version?  Would you build a Church inside your house?  I’d never seen anything like it. Feel free to leave a comment below.

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